Celebrating Earth

Posted on 2015-04-22

 

Earth Day is not just about celebrating how wonderful our planet is (sure, it might rain diamonds on Jupiter, but can you breathe there); it’s also about giving back to Mother Nature. 

 

Since 1970 people across the world have come together to celebrate Earth Day. According to Forbes, it is the “largest, non-secular celebration” with over 1 billion people in 192 countries participating. Huge events and fests are being held and there are hundreds of petitions to sign from saving the Rhinos to alerting governments of the peoples’ call for change.

 

At Budget Insurance, we try to reduce our carbon footprint by practicing paperless insurance (buying insurance is only 1 call away) as well as currently residing in an eco‑friendly building. But what can you, as an individual, do to celebrate the earth? It doesn’t have to be something spectacular or life altering; it only needs to be a small change to your daily life. We might not change the world today, but we will make it better for generations to come.

 

Here are a few ideas in which you can celebrate Earth Day (and all the days after).

Plant trees

Why, you ask? Except for the whole turning CO2 into O2 thing, they also clean polluted air by trapping all the toxins in their leaves and bark. They can help with soil erosion, save water and even prevent water pollution. Studies have found that tree s have positive impacts on neighbourhoods: not only do they increase property values but they can also reduce the number of violent incidents.

 

Garden

This can be a family affair. By working in the garden, you turn the strain of everyday life into something good and wholesome that can feed the whole family (and save you a pretty penny). Why not give your kids a piece of ground to work with? In this way, they’ll have fun and learn valuable lessons of responsibility and endurance. It doesn’t matter if you have a big yard or barely a balcony to call your own, use pot plants to brighten up your house. Put dinner on the plate and keep the air nice and fresh, with a row of herbs in your kitchen window or a head of lettuce in the bathroom.

 

Reuse

Do you really need to buy a plastic bag every time you go grocery shopping? By reusing bags, you doing something good for the environment and you’re saving money. So start carrying bags with you today. Stop buying bottled water; rather keep a glass bottle at your desk. Look into hospice or charity shops – you can find great bargains from furniture to clothing to books (and everything in between), but more than that you can also donate the things you no longer want or need.

 

Meat-free Mondays

No one is saying you should go without a protein-fix forever just for one day in the week will make a difference to the environment (as well as your health). According to Meatless Mondays the meat industry generates nearly one-fifth of our greenhouse gas emissions. Unfortunately, we not only have to be weary of greenhouse gas emissions, the production of meat and even cheese lays a heavy demand on our other resources such as water.

 

Change your driving

Not just good for the environment but also for your safety (and your pocket). Stick to the speed limit and you can reduce your fuel consumption by 10%. Being stuck in traffic makes up a big part of our day and can take a big bite out of our fuel budget. Rather restart your car than to keep idling, while sitting in back-to-back traffic. Remember to check your tyre pressure regularly. Properly inflated tyres will not only save on their wear-and-tear and handling on the road, but it can also decrease fuel consumption by 6%. If you work with people who also live close to you, start a carpool. You can save money on fuel, there will be fewer kilometres on your car, and you’ll be emitting less greenhouse gasses.

 

Clean the community

When you go on your daily (weekly) walk, take a bag (and gloves) with you and start to pick up the garbage lying around. Take your family and friends with you, or get the whole community to participate and start cleaning up the streets. The results will be shocking. Littering is a disease infecting our streets, rivers and parks – don’t just stand and watch it happen.

 

Everyone, everywhere is constantly changing the world. With what you say and how you say it, with what you do and how you do it. You are changing the world as we speak, are you making it better or worse?

Meghan Tschanz, 2015


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